Microsoft Edge Not as Adobe Flash-Friendly

Microsoft Edge Not as Adobe Flash-Friendly

Microsoft Edge has recently been changed and updated. While this is nothing unusual, what is unusual is the sudden choice to no longer be as Adobe Flash-friendly as it once was. The blocking of Adobe Flash by Microsoft's primary web browser can have significant repercussions for businesses and web users alike. As a business owner, you may wonder whether your website and your various bells and whistles will be affected by these changes. In order to understand what is going on with Microsoft Edge and its relationship with Adobe Flash, get to know more about the rationale behind the decision as well as how your business may be adversely impacted.

The primary purpose behind the recent changes made to Microsoft Edge is to make it more competitive with the popular Google Chrome web browser. Among efforts to do just that is the change to how Adobe Flash works on the Edge browser. Now, instead of Adobe Flash plugins playing and loading immediately when a person navigates a website, the application will be blocked.

An alert will come up near the address bar, letting users know that Adobe Flash has been blocked and will give the option to run the add-on or continue blocking it. For businesses that use Adobe Flash throughout their websites, this can be a frustrating change as visitors will need to take an extra step to access the full website.

However, there are numerous legitimate reasons for these changes to the Microsoft Edge browser. The most important of these issues is the fact that Adobe Flash is a security risk and is easily hackable, making it more likely for information and control to be lost to web users. Another issue is the fact that Adobe Flash is a big drain on battery life for computers and other devices.

The theory is that Adobe Flash is on its way out, and that newer, better systems are on their way in. As of now, Windows Insider users are the only ones with access to these updates, but soon the updates will go global and be made available to all users. In fact, Microsoft plans to eventually automatically load HTML5 web information first without loading Adobe Flash content at all.

Because so many sites use Adobe Flash, this can mean major renovations to existing web content. If you worry about the impact this will have on your business, contact us for immediate help and assistance in maximizing your website usability before these changes go live for all Microsoft Edge users.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.